FRISIAN RUNES The runes are an ancient alphabet used by the Germanic peoples. They were in use by the peoples of Northern Europe since the beginning of the Christian era (1 A.D.). Inscriptions were initially carved in wood, hence their angular shape. Inscriptions of the 'old' runic script (100 A.D. till 700 A.D.) are very rare, and are found on only 200 items. The first runes were carved in Southern Juteland in Denmark (also the place of origination of the proto-Frisians).The Germanic tribes called the runic alphabet after the sound value of the first six letters, Futhark. The Futhark comprises a 24 letter alphabet arranged in a unique order. This is the Germanic futhark: The runes were used for two purposes: to send messages of a plain nature, and for religious, ritual and magical purposes. In areas populated by Angles, Saxons and Frisians, new letters were developed, to a total of 26 runes. This alphabet is known as the Anglo-Frisian Futhorc. This is Frisian In Friesland only 21 runic inscriptions (Frisian) have been found on items of wood, bone, antler, ivory and gold. These inscriptions date from 450 A.D. to 750 A.D. CHARACTER OF THE FRISIANS Talents Apart from their literary talents, the Frisians are not very artistic. There is a saying in Latin: "Frisia non cantat, Frisia ratiocinatur" (Friesland doesn't sing, Friesland counsels). A talent that sets Frisians apart from other Dutch people is their intellect. No part of the Netherlands has produced as many intellectuals, autodidacts and inventors. A result of this talent is that Frisians can't be bluffed into an opinion, but want to be convinced. Only logic evidence can convince the Frisian. Temperament Concerning temperament, we can classify the Frisian as the emotional, non-active type. There is a fire in every Frisian person, but it smolders. Only in certain instances, mostly unfavorable, this fire rages out and it becomes uncontrollable. On the other hand this "ever smoldering fire" is the fuel of the Frisian idealism, which is highly developed. The Frisian person is very sensitive, but has great problems in showing his inner feelings. This inner physical tension can lead to great feelings of discontent. This feeling of discontent can lead to melancholy. In Friesland there are comparatively much more people with melancholia than in other regions of the Netherlands. Also severe depression at a youthful age is not uncommon. Aspirations Ambition is the most important motivation for the Frisian person to act. This can be seen in the public sports as speed skating on ice and sailing. If one follows a Frisian skater closely (on his heels), no matter his or her age, every one of them will start to glow inside and speed up. The downside of this ambition is that larger relations fall apart because of the large drive for personal gratification. The Frisian is a very proud person. Their nature forces them to be so. The national anthem illustrates this fact when it says: "trochloftich folk fan dizze alde nãmme" (illustrious folk of this old name). Individualism is a strong trade of the Frisian's character. In this individualism he/she is very opinionated. The Friesian has to personally reflect opinions of others before he acts or speaks on them. Frisian principles and norms Even today one can say Frisians live according their own norms. These norms differ considerably from other regions in the Netherlands (especially the Randstad). They love a fair fight and they hate humbug. There is a saying that goes: "Act normal, that's strange enough". Other principles they live by are their loyalty to a given word, feeling of right and wrong and their social caring.
1. Frysk bloed tsjoch op! wol no ris brûze en siede, En bûnzje troch ús ieren om! Flean op! Wy sjonge it bêste lân fan d'ierde, It Fryske lân fol eare en rom. CHORUS: Klink dan en daverje fier yn it rûn Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske grûn! Klink dan en daverje fier yn it rûn Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske grûn! 2. Hoe ek fan oermacht, need en see betrutsen, Oerâlde, leave Fryske grûn, Nea waard dy fêste, taaie bân ferbrutsen, Dy't Friezen oan har lân ferbûn. Chorus
3. Fan bûgjen frjemd, bleau by 't âld folk yn eare Syn namme en taal, syn frije sin; Syn wurd wie wet; rjocht, sljocht en trou syn leare, En twang, fan wa ek, stie it tsjin. Chorus 4. Fan bûgjen frjemd, bleau by 't âld folk yn eare Syn namme en taal, syn frije sin; Syn wurd wie wet; rjocht, sljocht en trou syn leare, En twang, fan wa ek, stie it tsjin.

The Friesian skating tradition.

The Friesians being surrounded by lakes have a long history when it comes to skating. There has been mention of skaters visiting all eleven cities of Friesland on one day since 1760. The Elfstedentocht was already part of Frisian tradition when, in 1890, Pim Mulier conceived the idea of an organised tour, which was first held in 1909. After this race, the Vereniging De Friesche Elf Steden(nl) (Association of the Eleven Frisian Cities) was established to organise the tours. The winters of 1939/40, 1940/41 and 1941/42 were particularly severe, with the race being run in each of them. The 1940 race, run three months prior to the German invasion of the Netherlands, saw over 3,000 competitors start at 05:00 on 30 January, with the first five finishing at 16:34. The event dominated the front pages of Dutch newspapers. The Elfstedentocht of 1963 became known as "The hell of '63" when only 69 of the 10,000 participants were able to finish the race, due to the extremely low temperatures, -18 °C, and a harsh eastern wind. Conditions were so horrendous that the 1963 winner, Reinier Paping, became a national hero, and the tour itself legendary. The next Elfstedentocht after 1963 was held in 1985; times had changed. Before, one of the best methods to stay warm during the tour was to wear newspapers underneath the clothes. In the 20 years between the tours of 1963 and 1985, clothing, training methods and skates became much more advanced, changing the nature of skating. The tour of 1985 was terminated prematurely because of thawing; as early as 22:00 in the evening skaters were taken off the ice. In 1986 the current Dutch King (at the time still Crown Prince) Willem-Alexander completed the Elfstedentocht under the name W.A. van Buren, Van Buren being a traditional pseudonym of the Royal House. MORE
Frisia "It Fryske Folksliet" (The Frisian Folksong)
The History of the Frisian Folk
FRISIAN RUNES

The runes are an ancient alphabet used by the Germanic

peoples. They were in use by the peoples of Northern Europe

since the beginning of the Christian era (1 A.D.). Inscriptions

were initially carved in wood, hence their angular shape.

Inscriptions of the 'old' runic script (100 A.D. till 700 A.D.) are

very rare, and are found on only 200 items. The first runes

were carved in Southern Juteland in Denmark (also the place

of origination of the proto-Frisians).The Germanic tribes called

the runic alphabet after the sound value of the first six letters,

Futhark. The Futhark comprises a 24 letter alphabet arranged

in a unique order. This is the Germanic futhark:

The runes were used for two purposes: to send messages of

a plain nature, and for religious, ritual and magical purposes.

In areas populated by Angles, Saxons and Frisians, new

letters were developed, to a total of 26 runes. This alphabet is

known as the Anglo-Frisian Futhorc. This is Frisian

In Friesland only 21 runic inscriptions (Frisian) have been

found on items of wood, bone, antler, ivory and gold. These

inscriptions date from 450 A.D. to 750 A.D.

CHARACTER OF THE FRISIANS

Talents

Apart from their literary talents, the Frisians are not very

artistic. There is a saying in Latin: "Frisia non cantat, Frisia

ratiocinatur" (Friesland doesn't sing, Friesland counsels).

A talent that sets Frisians apart from other Dutch people is

their intellect. No part of the Netherlands has produced as

many intellectuals, autodidacts and inventors. A result of this

talent is that Frisians can't be bluffed into an opinion, but want

to be convinced. Only logic evidence can convince the

Frisian.

Temperament

Concerning temperament, we can classify the Frisian as the

emotional, non-active type. There is a fire in every Frisian

person, but it smolders. Only in certain instances, mostly

unfavorable, this fire rages out and it becomes uncontrollable.

On the other hand this "ever smoldering fire" is the fuel of the

Frisian idealism, which is highly developed.

The Frisian person is very sensitive, but has great problems

in showing his inner feelings. This inner physical tension can

lead to great feelings of discontent. This feeling of discontent

can lead to melancholy. In Friesland there are comparatively

much more people with melancholia than in other regions of

the Netherlands. Also severe depression at a youthful age is

not uncommon.

Aspirations

Ambition is the most important motivation for the Frisian

person to act. This can be seen in the public sports as speed

skating on ice and sailing. If one follows a Frisian skater

closely (on his heels), no matter his or her age, every one of

them will start to glow inside and speed up.

The downside of this ambition is that larger relations fall apart

because of the large drive for personal gratification.

The Frisian is a very proud person. Their nature forces them

to be so. The national anthem illustrates this fact when it

says: "trochloftich folk fan dizze alde nãmme" (illustrious folk

of this old name).

Individualism is a strong trade of the Frisian's character. In

this individualism he/she is very opinionated. The Friesian has

to personally reflect opinions of others before he acts or

speaks on them.

Frisian principles and norms

Even today one can say Frisians live according their own

norms. These norms differ considerably from other regions in

the Netherlands (especially the Randstad). They love a fair

fight and they hate humbug.

There is a saying that goes: "Act normal, that's strange

enough".

Other principles they live by are their loyalty to a given word,

feeling of right and wrong and their social caring.

Frisia

"It Fryske Folksliet" (The Frisian Folksong)

1. Frysk bloed tsjoch op! wol no ris brûze en siede, En bûnzje troch ús ieren om! Flean op! Wy sjonge it bêste lân fan d'ierde, It Fryske lân fol eare en rom. CHORUS: Klink dan en daverje fier yn it rûn Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske grûn! Klink dan en daverje fier yn it rûn Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske grûn! 2. Hoe ek fan oermacht, need en see betrutsen, Oerâlde, leave Fryske grûn, Nea waard dy fêste, taaie bân ferbrutsen, Dy't Friezen oan har lân ferbûn. Chorus
3. Fan bûgjen frjemd, bleau by 't âld folk yn eare Syn namme en taal, syn frije sin; Syn wurd wie wet; rjocht, sljocht en trou syn leare, En twang, fan wa ek, stie it tsjin. Chorus 4. Fan bûgjen frjemd, bleau by 't âld folk yn eare Syn namme en taal, syn frije sin; Syn wurd wie wet; rjocht, sljocht en trou syn leare, En twang, fan wa ek, stie it tsjin.

Bûter, brea en griene tsiis, wa't dat net

sizze kin, is gjin oprjochte Fries

The Friesian skating tradition. The Friesians being surrounded by lakes have a long history when it comes to skating. There has been mention of skaters visiting all eleven cities of Friesland on one day since 1760. The Elfstedentocht was already part of Frisian tradition when, in 1890, Pim Mulier conceived the idea of an organised tour, which was first held in 1909. After this race, the Vereniging De Friesche Elf Steden(nl) (Association of the Eleven Frisian Cities) was established to organise the tours. The winters of 1939/40, 1940/41 and 1941/42 were particularly severe, with the race being run in each of them. The 1940 race, run three months prior to the German invasion of the Netherlands, saw over 3,000 competitors start at 05:00 on 30 January, with the first five finishing at 16:34. The event dominated the front pages of Dutch newspapers. The Elfstedentocht of 1963 became known as "The hell of '63" when only 69 of the 10,000 participants were able to finish the race, due to the extremely low temperatures, -18 °C, and a harsh eastern wind. Conditions were so horrendous that the 1963 winner, Reinier Paping, became a national hero, and the tour itself legendary. The next Elfstedentocht after 1963 was held in 1985; times had changed. Before, one of the best methods to stay warm during the tour was to wear newspapers underneath the clothes. In the 20 years between the tours of 1963 and 1985, clothing, training methods and skates became much more advanced, changing the nature of skating. The tour of 1985 was terminated prematurely because of thawing; as early as 22:00 in the evening skaters were taken off the ice. In 1986 the current Dutch King (at the time still Crown Prince) Willem- Alexander completed the Elfstedentocht under the name W.A. van Buren, Van Buren being a traditional pseudonym of the Royal House. MORE
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